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Since its invention in 1886 by Colonel John Pemberton as a cure for his morphine addiction, the Coca-Cola logo has become a familiar sight globally.  Although the coca was removed in 1903, the recipe has remained unchanged all these years.  Even today, the name Coca-Cola is synonymous with its iconic glass bottle.

bottles

After nearly a century in existence, Coca-Cola created its first brand extension in 1982 with the launch of Diet Coke which was then swiftly followed by Cherry Coke and trials of Lemon and Vanilla flavours.  More recently we’ve seen the launch of Coca-Cola Zero.  What’s been consistent with each new flavour is the familiar red and white branding.

all 

But hold onto your hats because a radical change has happened.  Coca-Cola Life, sweetened with stevia rather than aspartame, has been launched in a green can; is such a major shift in iconography a risky branding move?

Coke-Life

Coke Life will be hitting UK supermarket shelves in the autumn.  What do you think of the new design?

securityThink you do enough to remain secure while online?  Password security has been a hot topic recently (a subject we will return to in a later blog) but you need to be ever vigilant as more sophisticated threats emerge on an almost daily basis.  We’ve put together the following checklist to ensure your data and systems are never compromised:

  1. Install hardware and software firewalls. One can catch problems the other may miss.
  2. Install antivirus software. Your computer needs to be infected with a virus only once to realise the value of this step. After installation, make sure to always install the updates as they become available.
  3. Never run .exe attachments or downloads unless you are sure of their authenticity. Doing so makes it way too easy for hackers to load a Trojan horse or execute malicious code.
  4. Consider encrypting sensitive data on your computer. If your machine is compromised, your critical documents will be unintelligible.
  5. Be wary of emails from people you don’t know or trust. Delete any emails you think are suspicious. Delete the email from your ‘Inbox’, and delete it again from your ‘Deleted’ folder, or ‘Sent’ folder if you have forwarded on the email
  6. Never click onto a link or an attachment in an email, obtained from a source you don’t know or trust
  7. Before entering any personal data, make sure that the address in the URL begins with https: to ensure a secure connection and that your data will be encrypted.