mainlogo
Systematic
Marketing

Since its invention in 1886 by Colonel John Pemberton as a cure for his morphine addiction, the Coca-Cola logo has become a familiar sight globally.  Although the coca was removed in 1903, the recipe has remained unchanged all these years.  Even today, the name Coca-Cola is synonymous with its iconic glass bottle.

bottles

After nearly a century in existence, Coca-Cola created its first brand extension in 1982 with the launch of Diet Coke which was then swiftly followed by Cherry Coke and trials of Lemon and Vanilla flavours.  More recently we’ve seen the launch of Coca-Cola Zero.  What’s been consistent with each new flavour is the familiar red and white branding.

all 

But hold onto your hats because a radical change has happened.  Coca-Cola Life, sweetened with stevia rather than aspartame, has been launched in a green can; is such a major shift in iconography a risky branding move?

Coke-Life

Coke Life will be hitting UK supermarket shelves in the autumn.  What do you think of the new design?

One of the issues in data collection is how we use it. I have always prescribed that data is used as an aid to decision making, but all too often is used as a method of control and apportioning blame.

A recent report on the use of, and future direction for, data in the US cultural industry (don’t let that put you off, there’s a lot to learn from it even for commercial organisations) identified 6 factors that influence the gathering and collection if data and provide some preliminary suggestions for making better use of data. All make sense, but, as you might expect, the one that grabbed my attention was:

“Shift the conversation from data’s value as an accountability tool to data’s value as a decision-making tool.”

But As Barry Hessenius comments in his blog on the report:

“The question that always looms is “how”? How do you refocus all the data, research, information and input that is out there from being merely a tool to prove, after the fact, that a given program, project or approach has met its objective to information that informs decision making in the first place?”

An excellent question indeed.

I’d be interested in hearing how you approach this in your organisation, leave a comment.

Read Barry’s blog post.

The report can be downloaded here.

Seth Godin posted a blog “The complaining customer doesn’t want a refund” and it reminded me of a lesson I learnt many years ago.

Back in the mists of time when I was doing a stint in a sales office when one of the reps received a call from a disgruntled customer. The rep, while raising his eyes to the roof, tried some platitudes but this was a serious complaint. The rep decided he’d had a enough and transferred the call to the area manager (sitting in the same office as it happened). What a difference. He was only in the phone for a couple of minutes with the customer. Hanging up he grabbed his jacket and drove the 100 or so miles to visit the customer. He arrived back a few hours later, not only with an appeased customer but with an order for mush more than the original one. We also used the feedback to put in place procedures so that wouldn’t happen again.

Customers who complain are likely to value what you offer – those that don’t just walk. The complaining customer can become your best advocate.

 

I get to see a fair few business cards when I’m out and about.

Many are absolutely fine, some are tacky, some flashy, some are even whole little booklets (which I will probably never read). The problem I have, and I am sure I am not alone, is that when I am going through them later (sometimes a lot later) can I remember where I met this person?

Taragh's card

If I have time just after, or even when, I get given a card I do make notes on it, but I was impressed by Taragh Bissett‘s card when she gave it to me.

It actually takes into account that you want to remember these things! And as she stands there filling in the details it makes you feel that the card’s worth having – and is one you’ll keep.

Sometimes all it takes is a little bit of thought.